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Environmental Economy

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Show Table: 2.1 Ireland: Environmental tax revenue 2000-2018

Environmental tax revenues in Ireland amounted to €5.1 billion in 2018, its highest level since 2000, except for 2017.

Energy taxes accounted for 62.0% of the total environmental tax revenue in 2018, while transport taxes accounted for 37.5% of the total. Pollution and resource taxes contributed 0.5% of the total environmental tax revenue in 2018.

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Pollution/ResourceTransportEnergy
Latvia0.321.359.57
Slovenia0.351.28.66
Greece02.058.16
Croatia0.042.186.86
Bulgaria0.21.037.84
Estonia0.880.177.75
Cyprus0.021.976.63
Netherlands1.132.684.79
Malta0.73.434.27
Denmark0.383.384.37
Italy0.091.526.29
Ireland0.072.9164.914
Poland0.370.676.83
Romania0.020.557.09
Portugal0.052.055.43
United Kingdom0.191.615.22
Finland0.062.254.59
Hungary0.710.924.99
Lithuania0.330.285.88
EU280.21.224.72
Czech Republic0.030.375.46
Austria0.052.083.58
Spain0.240.694.5
Slovakia0.070.544.75
Belgium0.271.483.23
France0.290.554.12
Sweden0.090.983.79
Germany00.793.84
Luxembourg0.050.314.04

Environmental taxes accounted for 7.9% of Ireland’s total tax revenues in 2017. This was the joint 11th highest percentage in the EU and above the EU average of 6.1%. Latvia had the highest environmental tax share of total tax revenue in 2017 at 11.2%, while Luxembourg had the lowest share at 4.4%.

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Show Table: 2.2 Ireland: Environmental subsidies and similar transfers 2000-2017

Environmental subsidies and similar transfers in Ireland reached €895 million in 2017.

Transfers associated with the production of energy from renewable resources increased from an average annual 1% of all environmental transfers in 2000-2004 to 31% in 2017. Transfers associated with waste water management fell from 61% of total environmental transfers in 2000-2004 to 26% in 2017.

 

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Show Table: 2.3 Ireland: Consumer price index for energy products 2000-2018

ElectricityGasSolid fuelsPetrolDiesel
200065.548.86887.582.9
200165.749.973.58172.9
200271.550.176.583.975.9
200379.25378.784.578.5
200484.855.681.592.886.8
20059664.787.7100.799.4
200610081.894.4107.5104.7
2007111.690.6102.6108.9105.1
2008114.391.2112116.9121.7
2009115.893.7120.5107.799.3
2010111.783.6117.5126.7119.4
2011119.189.1118.2144.2138.7
2012132.6102.7118.6157.7151.4
2013140109.5123153.1146.1
2014145111.8131147.8140.5
2015144.8109.2134.8132.8122.3
2016139.7105.9134.3124.3111.1
2017138.3104.2133.9132.2120.7
2018148109.3134.8139.7129.7

The consumer price index for electricity in Ireland increased from 100 in December 2006 to 148 in 2018, higher than for any other energy product. In contrast, gas prices only increased by 9.3% over the same period. The consumer price index for other energy products grew by 29.7% for diesel, 34.8% for solid fuels and 39.7% for petrol between December 2006 and 2018.

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Show Table: 2.4 Ireland: Domestic material consumption 1995-2017

Domestic extraction of resources in Ireland increased from an average annual 85.8 million tonnes in 1995-1999 to 136.5 million tonnes in 2005-2009, before falling to 76.3 million tonnes in 2015. In 2017 the figure had increased to 90.8 million tonnes. 

Domestic material consumption (DMC) increased from an average annual 101.8 million tonnes in 1995-1999 to 160.3 million tonnes in 2005-2009, before falling to 96.9 million tonnes in 2015. In 2017 DMC had increased to 112.8 million tonnes.

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Show Table: 2.5 Ireland: Fish landings by Irish vessels in Irish ports 2007-2016

Fish landings by Irish vessels in Irish ports varied between 149,200 tonnes (in 2008) and 249,200 tonnes (in 2012) over the period from 2007-2016. In 2016 this figure was 207,600 tonnes.

Atlantic Mackerel was the most common fish species landed in Irish ports by Irish vessels, at 31.2% of the total in 2016, followed by Horse Mackerel at 12.6% of the total in that year.

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Show Table: 2.6 Ireland: Domestic building energy ratings by period of construction 2009-2019

Dwellings built in 2015-2019 were considerably more energy efficient than in earlier periods with 97% given an “A” building energy rating compared with 36% in 2010-2014 and 1% in 2005-2009. 

In contrast, the proportion of dwellings with an "F" or “G” building energy rating fell from 33% in dwellings constructed between 1700-1977 to 0% in 2015-2019.

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Show Table: 2.7 Ireland: Domestic metered water consumption 2014-2016

The average domestic metered public water consumption per day in 2016 was 351 litres. This was an 8.4% decrease compared with the 2015 average of 383 litres.

In contrast to average consumption, the median consumption per meter per day in 2016 at 249 litres was 1.2% higher than the 2015 figure of 246 litres.

Median consumption reflects typical levels of consumption better than average consumption as the median is less affected by meters with very high levels of water use.

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Show Table: 2.8 Ireland: Networked gas consumption by sector 2011-2017

Total networked gas consumption in Ireland fell from 53,300 gigawatt hours in 2011 to 47,200 in 2014 before rising to 54,800 gigawatt hours in 2017.

Power plants accounted for 63% of total networked gas consumption in 2017 compared with 24% by the non-residential sector and 13% by the residential sector.

Go to next chapter: Air