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Energy

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Show Table: 7.1 Ireland: Primary energy production 1990-2017

Total average annual primary energy production in Ireland was 3.4 million tonnes of oil equivalent from 1990-1994. It fell to 1.6 million toe in 2005-2009, before rising to 4.9 million toe in 2017.

Natural gas, as a proportion of total primary energy production declined from an average annual 60% in 1990-1994 to 6% in 2015. It increased to 59% in 2016 with the coming on stream of the Corrib Gas Field, and was 58% in 2017.

Peat products varied between 25% (in 2012) and 58% (in 2003) of total primary energy production over the 1990-2015 period. They fell to 15% in 2017 mainly due to the increase in natural gas production.

The share of renewable energy in primary energy production increased from an average annual 5% in 1990-1994 to 52% in 2015 before decreasing to 24% in 2017.

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Show Table: 7.2 EU: Final energy consumption by fuel type 2016

Renewable energy accounted for 3% of Ireland’s total final energy consumption in 2016. This was the joint third lowest in the EU. Latvia had the highest share of renewable energy in 2016 at 23% and Malta and the Netherlands had the joint lowest at 2%.

Oil accounted for 58% of Ireland’s total final energy consumption in 2016 compared with an EU28 average of 39%. Slovakia was the EU Member State with the lowest share of oil used in final energy consumption at 22%, while Cyprus had the highest share at 71%.

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WindBiomassHydroGeothermalLandfill gasLiquid biofuelBiogasSolar
1990-19940.670895.094735724989267.8540.04776002.8035120.090744
1995-19997.499298.619523133324666.66720.0477614.566803.916320.105072
2000-200435.69124.80820502213361.62760.81825797750267320.62276806.3902880.181488
2005-2009172.9898951138175.29225486592866.94525673809399.7289631589638933.610372649869414.570935147341110.62341336686472.22819334827027
00000000
2010242.06067787196.64491655068551.53387786817215.701009855897444.155811515009725.52212372214.24194261810917.53933665510561
2011376.7070644322193.02071447842360.77508411680417.256942656974143.743731196200723.96303070268813.80627618870369.12187103500303
2012344.901128296222.34594409782469.001988581977618.752484214851942.979400797369824.48441221415612.923532256094110.2582623906278
2013390.57024528231.71523800479651.55677273528220.36741326701537.788779274270421.81762680121611.443677581561411.3384164941723
2014442.045256062261.81906937992560.9442324252622.846835692976439.064855679693922.58440154659213.156909078968512.2912288526347
2015565.277794202258.17363727662869.3581559968627.006210717095641.011254769021524.29743516147213.605545323804413.1368073538419
2016528.7717148019290.46926911801858.56819183590432.301898856466238.857632075248324.40852001174415.923485443511114.2949249341277
2017640.2478013059348.85785682079259.47784964114441.304777500105538.14075786802825.47759547881616.459452489471413.572088105266

The amount of renewable energy production in Ireland has increased from an average annual 167 kilotonnes of oil equivalent (ktoe) in 1990-1994 to 1,184 ktoe in 2017.

Wind has been the main source of renewable energy production in Ireland in recent years. In 2017, 54% of renewable energy production was attributable to wind and 29% to biomass. The share of renewable energy accounted for by hydro power fell from 41% in 1990-1994 to 5% in 2017.

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Show Table: 7.3 Ireland: Electricity generation from renewable sources 1990-2017

The share of renewable energy sources used in the generation of electricity in Ireland has increased from an average annual 5% in 1990-1994 to 30.1% in 2017.

Wind is the main source of renewables used in electricity generation, with its share rising from 0% in 1990-1994 to 25.2% of the total ktoe used to generate electricity in Ireland in 2017.

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% total electricity generation
Austria72.173
Sweden65.885
Denmark60.356
Latvia54.357
Portugal54.168
Croatia46.415
Romania41.634
Spain36.339
Finland35.221
Germany 34.405
Italy34.104
Slovenia32.427
EU2830.747
Ireland30.09
United Kingdom28.111
Greece24.473
Slovakia21.343
France19.907
Bulgaria19.117
Lithuania18.254
Belgium17.237
Estonia17.027
Netherlands13.804
Czech Republic13.654
Poland13.089
Cyprus8.905
Luxembourg8.054
Hungary7.485
Malta6.585

Ireland’s share of renewable sources in total electricity generation in 2017 at 30.1% was 13th highest among EU Member States and close to the EU average of 30.7%.

Austria had the highest proportion of total electricity generated from renewable sources at 72.2% and Malta the lowest at 6.6% in 2017.

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Show Table: 7.4 Ireland: Heat consumption from renewable sources 1990-2017

Consumption of heat from renewable energy sources in Ireland has grown from an average annual 2.3% in 1990-1994 to 6.8% in 2017. Biomass accounted for 5.4% of total heat consumption in 2017. The national target for heat from renewable energy sources is 12% by 2020.

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Show Table: 7.5 Ireland: Transport energy consumption from renewable sources 2006-2017

Renewable energy sources used in transport have grown from an average annual 0.9% of total transport energy consumption in 2006-2009 to 7.4% in 2017. Biodiesel accounted for 89% of renewable energy sources used in transport in 2017.

The national target set out in the 2007 Energy White Paper for renewable energy sources used in transport is 10% by 2020.

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Show Table: 7.6 Ireland: Net imports of fuel 1990-2017

Ireland’s net imports of fuel peaked in 2005-2009 at an average annual 14.5 million tonnes of oil equivalent (toe). It decreased to 9.8 million toe in 2017.

The proportion of fuel imports accounted for by coal products fell from an average annual 27% in 1990-1994 to 12% in 2017.

The proportion of fuel imports accounted for by natural gas increased from an average annual 0% in 1990-1994 to a peak of 32% in 2010-2014 before falling to 14% in 2017, as production from the Corrib Gas Field came on stream. 

Crude oil and other oil products (such as diesel, gasoline and jet kerosene) accounted for 72% of all Irish fuel imports in 2017.

Go to next chapter: Transport