Back to Top

Central Statistics Office

Search currently unavailable

 Skip navigation

Extra information
Methodology Previous Releases
International comparison:
See also:
YouTube Video
For more information on this release:
E-mail: information@cso.ie Maureen Delamere (+353) 21 453 5081
For general information on CSO statistics:
information@cso.ie (+353) 21 453 5000 Visit StatCentral.ie, the portal to Ireland's official statistics On-line ISSN
CSO statistical release, , 11am

Cross Border Shopping Survey

Quarter 1 2018

 Percentage of households who did cross border shoppingTotal expenditure (€'000s) on cross border shopping
State13.6458,263
Region   
Border44.3286,527
Midland11.518,276
West9.016,801
Dublin19.489,511
Mid-East15.124,176 
Mid-West1.83,898
South-East2.610,193
South-West1.08,881

Estimated cross border shopping spend of €458 million

Figure 1 Households who made shopping trips to Northern Ireland
go to full release

The Cross Border Shopping survey was included in the General Household Survey (GHS) in the first quarter (January to March) of 2018. One member of each household answered questions on behalf of the household about travel to Northern Ireland in the previous 12 months and specifically about shopping in Northern Ireland. The questions on shopping in Northern Ireland focused on how much households spent and the frequency of shopping trips. Online purchases are not included.

The regional groupings in this release are presented on the basis of the old NUTS 3 or regional groupings, so Louth remains in the Border region for the purposes of this release.

Summary of main findings

  • It is estimated that total household expenditure on shopping in Northern Ireland in the 12 months to Quarter 1 2018 was €458 million.
  • The average amount spent by households on shopping on their most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland was €275.
  • 14% of households made at least one shopping trip to Northern Ireland in the 12 months before the Q1 2018 survey.
  • One fifth of households in Dublin shopped in Northern Ireland during the 12 months prior to the Q1 2018 survey.
  • 88% of shopping trips were same-day visits.
  • Households in the Border region who shop in Northern Ireland, have an average of almost 16 shopping trips a year.

Users should note that the survey instrument used to carry out the Cross-Border Shopping survey has changed since the survey was last carried out in Q2 2010, when it was carried out as a module of the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS). The Labour Force Survey (LFS) has now replaced the QNHS. With this change, surveys previously carried out as modules of the QNHS, are now carried out as part of the General Household Survey (GHS). This change has affected sample size. Achieved sample size for the Q1 2018 survey was 5,291 households. Further information is available in the Background Notes.

Household shopping trips

Households were asked how many trips were made to Northern Ireland by household members in the 12 months before the interview and how many of these trips were for the purpose of shopping. Routine trips such as trips to a person’s place of employment, to college, to farmland/property across the border, etc. were not included.

In the 12 months before the interview, 13.6% of households made at least one shopping trip to Northern Ireland. See table 1a.

Over 44% of households living in the Border region took shopping trips to Northern Ireland over the previous 12 months, while nearly one fifth (19.4%) of households in the Dublin region, and 15.1% of households in the Mid-East region made cross border shopping trips. The lowest proportions of households making shopping trips to Northern Ireland were in the regions at furthest distance, namely the South-East (2.6%), Mid-West (1.8%) and South-West (1%) regions. See table 1a.

Nearly one fifth (19.5%) of households comprised of 3 adults with dependent children made shopping trips to Northern Ireland in the 12 months prior to interview, compared with 9.6% of households made up of one adult with no dependent children. See table 1a.

Nearly six out of every 10 (57.3%) of Border region households comprised of 3 or more adults with dependent children made shopping trips across the border. Nearly one quarter (24.7%) of similar composition households in the Midlands region took shopping trips. In the Border region, just over one third (34.2%) of households comprised of one adult and no dependent children took shopping trips to Northern Ireland. See table 1b.

Shopping trips by region

Of the total number of shopping trips to Northern Ireland, 39.1% were made by households from the Dublin region while 31.1% of shopping trips were made by households from the Border region. The frequency of trips by households in the Border region was 15.8 compared with 2.1 for the Dublin region. See table 1c.

Number of nights spent

Nearly nine tenths (88%) of all shopping trips to Northern Ireland in the 12 months prior to the Q1 2018 survey were same-day visits, 6.7% involved staying one overnight. Nearly one third (32.3%) of shopping trips made by households in the West region involved one overnight. Less than 1% of households making shopping trips to Northern Ireland stayed 4 nights or more. See table 1d and figure 3.

Number of household members on most recent shopping trip

Respondents who shopped in Northern Ireland in the previous 12 months, were asked how many persons in the household went on the most recent shopping trip. Over 40% of cross border shopping trips were taken by just one person from the household, while 11% were taken by 4 or more household members - 6.5% by 4 persons, 3.1% by 5 persons and 1.4% by 6 persons from the household. See table 1e.

Type of purchase in Northern Ireland

Households were asked to indicate their total expenditure on their most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland. The total expenditure on shopping was broken down into seven categories – Alcohol, Cosmetics, Food and groceries (including tobacco), Medicine, Clothes, footwear and sports goods, Petrol/diesel and Other. The Other category specifically referred to other shopping expenditure. Other types of non-shopping expenditure such as expenditure on vehicles and services were not included.

Food and groceries was the most common category among all households who shopped in Northern Ireland (65.8%), 54.7% bought Clothes, footwear and sports goods, 40% bought Alcohol, 21.7% purchased Cosmetics and 13.5% purchased Petrol/diesel. Nearly three quarters (74.1%) of households in the Border region purchased Food and Groceries, compared with just over half (50.8%) of households in the Mid-East region. See table 2a and figure 4.

Household shopping expenditure on most recent trip

Households spent an average of €275 on shopping on their most recent trip to Northern Ireland. Average household expenditure on the most recent trip was highest for the Midland region at €363, followed by €289 for households in the West region and €287 for households in the Dublin region. Households comprised of 3 or more adults with dependent children spent €301 on their most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland while households comprised of 2 adults with dependent children spent €297. This compares with €230 for households comprised of 1 adult and no dependent children. Households where the age of the reference person was between 30 and 44 years spent an average of €291 on their most recent shopping trip, compared with €196 for households where the age of the reference person was 15 to 19 years. See table 2c.

Total household expenditure on shopping in Northern Ireland

By combining information on frequency of trips to Northern Ireland and total expenditure on the most recent trip, an estimate of total household expenditure on shopping in Northern Ireland has been calculated for the 12-month period up to Quarter 1 2018. It is estimated that households spent a total of €458 million on shopping in Northern Ireland in this period, with the Border region accounting for 63% of this total. See table 2d.

Table 1(a) Percentage of households who took shopping trips to Northern Ireland in the last 12 months, Quarter 1 2018
% households
 Percentage of households who took shopping trips to Northern IrelandNumber of shopping trips
012 to 56 to 1213 or over
State13.686.46.44.81.40.9
Region
Border44.355.77.017.710.19.5
Midland11.588.56.94.50.10.0
West9.091.04.74.30.00.0
Dublin19.480.612.94.91.50.1
Mid-East15.184.97.57.30.40.0
Mid-West1.898.21.40.20.00.2
South-East2.697.41.21.40.00.0
South-West1.099.00.70.30.00.0
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children9.690.44.53.50.90.7
2 adults no dependent children15.085.07.04.42.01.5
3 or more adults no dependent children12.487.65.05.41.20.8
1 adult with dependent children15.984.16.45.73.30.5
2 adults with dependent children14.985.17.55.61.00.8
3 or more adults with dependent children19.580.59.17.81.90.7
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged17.382.76.05.82.92.7
Second quintile - disadvantaged12.487.64.65.31.31.2
Third quintile - average11.388.74.54.81.30.7
Fourth quintile - affluent11.988.16.25.00.60.1
Fifth quintile - very affluent15.184.910.33.41.20.2
Age of reference person
15-1920.579.513.86.80.00.0
20-2914.685.47.05.31.11.3
30-4413.586.56.24.91.60.8
45-6415.184.96.85.61.70.9
65+11.188.95.43.61.11.0
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
>>>
No trips1 trip2-5 trips6-12 trips13+ trips
Border55.77.017.710.19.5
Midland88.56.94.50.10.0
West91.04.74.30.00.0
Dublin80.612.94.91.50.1
Mid-East84.97.57.30.40.0
Mid-West98.21.40.20.00.2
South-East97.41.21.40.00.0
South-West99.00.70.30.00.0
Table 1(b) Regional breakdown of households who took shopping trips to Northern Ireland in the last 12 months, Quarter 1 2018
% households
 BorderMidlandWestDublinMid-EastMid-WestSouth-EastSouth-West
State44.311.59.019.415.11.82.61.0
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children34.24.33.615.78.82.61.20.0
2 adults no dependent children47.415.311.923.18.31.02.90.6
3 or more adults no dependent children41.412.33.817.913.30.02.51.0
1 adult with dependent children44.814.30.015.230.13.35.42.6
2 adults with dependent children48.810.99.920.619.83.03.62.0
3 or more adults with dependent children57.324.722.120.927.00.02.12.6
Age of reference person
15-1932.70.066.818.339.30.00.00.0
20-2935.829.416.319.018.00.00.03.8
30-4444.56.77.415.818.62.94.41.9
45-6450.917.06.323.717.62.02.00.5
65+39.36.010.517.91.81.22.10.0
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
Table 1(c) Percentage shopping trips to Northern Ireland in the last 12 months, Quarter 1 2018
 Shopping trips to Northern IrelandAverage number of shopping trips
State100.08.4
Region
Border31.215.8
Midland5.02.0
West6.41.7
Dublin39.12.1
Mid-East13.91.9
Mid-West, South-East and South-West14.42.1
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children18.36.7
2 adults no dependent children30.511.8
3 or more adults no dependent children10.96.1
1 adult with dependent children4.36.5
2 adults with dependent children26.27.7
3 or more adults with dependent children9.75.0
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged24.711.8
Second quintile - disadvantaged17.78.9
Third quintile - average16.311.7
Fourth quintile - affluent18.72.2
Fifth quintile - very affluent22.62.1
Age of reference person
15-191.91.8
20-298.76.5
30-4427.79.7
45-6438.78.5
65+23.17.7
1These regions are grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
Table 1(d) Number of overnights spent on most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland, Quarter 1 2018
% households1
 Number of overnights
None1 night2 nights3 nights4 or more nights
State88.06.73.31.50.5
Region
Border95.81.80.61.50.3
Midland82.010.57.60.00.0
West49.932.315.12.70.0
Dublin90.36.12.31.30.0
Mid-East91.82.12.32.61.2
Mid-West, South-East and South-West262.919.711.40.05.9
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children89.28.80.81.20.0
2 adults no dependent children89.96.32.01.00.7
3 or more adults no dependent children91.24.61.52.70.0
1 adult with dependent children90.60.04.25.20.0
2 adults with dependent children85.16.55.41.91.1
3 or more adults with dependent children82.89.57.70.00.0
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged87.47.44.40.40.3
Second quintile - disadvantaged90.46.42.70.40.0
Third quintile - average85.67.03.62.31.5
Fourth quintile - affluent84.34.94.55.31.0
Fifth quintile - very affluent91.57.31.20.00.0
Age of reference person
15-1971.828.20.00.00.0
20-2980.513.22.93.30.0
30-4485.65.55.12.61.3
45-6489.05.74.20.90.2
65+93.35.60.00.80.3
1Households who took a shopping trip in the 12 months prior to interview.
2These regions have been grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
>>
No overnights1 night2 nights3 nights4+ nights
Border95.81.80.61.50.3
Midland82.010.57.60.00.0
West49.932.315.12.70.0
Dublin90.36.12.31.30.0
Mid-East91.82.12.32.61.2
Mid-West, South-East and South-West62.919.711.40.05.9
Table 1(e) Number of persons in the household who went on the most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland, Quarter 1 2018
% households1
 Number of persons2
123456 or more
State40.437.710.96.53.11.4
Region
Border40.239.78.66.82.22.5
Midland2644.37.28.26.77.6
West4532.84.118.100
Dublin39.6411143.80.6
Mid-East45.323.520.96.63.70
Mid-West, South-East and South-West343.837.67.97.92.80
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children67.821.77.42.700.5
2 adults no dependent children35.356.95.11.20.31.1
3 or more adults no dependent children38.5494.94.13.50
1 adult with dependent children23.939.821.386.90
2 adults with dependent children36.620.419.4138.22.5
3 or more adults with dependent children24.840.214.714.82.23.3
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged36.244.411.15.30.52.5
Second quintile - disadvantaged45.842.65.24.31.60.5
Third quintile - average29.740.911.113.63.11.5
Fourth quintile - affluent4426.715.16.25.62.3
Fifth quintile - very affluent45.633.211.44.75.10
Age of reference person
15-1962.57.511.91800
20-2940.740.49.85.53.60
30-4437.326.917.49.96.52.1
45-6440.338.810.85.92.61.5
65+42.550.13.62.900.9
1Households who took a shopping trip in the 12 months prior to interview.
2Number of persons in the household who went on the most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland.
3These regions have been grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
Table 2(a) Goods purchased on most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland, Quarter 1 2018
% households1
 AlcoholCosmeticsFood and groceries2MedicineClothes and sports goodsPetrol/ DieselOther
State40.021.765.816.654.713.519.1
Region
Border35.124.574.115.646.94.49.4
Midland36.329.067.719.357.734.117.2
West64.922.964.94.935.48.819.1
Dublin41.519.264.115.060.714.825.8
Mid-East36.915.050.828.859.518.419.3
Mid-West, South-East and South-West336.641.270.217.771.836.829.7
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children41.022.368.318.355.513.312.5
2 adults no dependent children41.916.370.613.047.18.819.3
3 or more adults no dependent children36.618.763.513.955.713.621.6
1 adult with dependent children44.942.963.338.070.223.721.1
2 adults with dependent children37.920.658.618.559.416.223.6
3 or more adults with dependent children39.034.568.613.456.616.315.2
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged40.325.681.314.653.911.616.2
Second quintile - disadvantaged32.420.163.416.747.17.213.8
Third quintile - average38.418.859.022.351.714.614.2
Fourth quintile - affluent38.327.364.018.967.019.325.5
Fifth quintile - very affluent47.916.157.112.853.614.724.7
Age of reference person
15-1929.619.742.80.069.19.23.9
20-2942.331.059.118.859.228.69.2
30-4438.923.060.219.156.917.125.4
45-6440.223.167.516.957.912.020.0
65+40.814.473.913.843.96.315.1
1Households who took a shopping trip to Northern Ireland in the 12 months prior to interview.
2Includes tobacco.
3These regions have been grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
Rows in this table do not sum to 100% as households may have purchased items in more than one category.
X-axis labelBorderMidlandWestDublinMid-EastMid-West, South-East and South-East
Alcohol353665413737
Cosmetics242923191541
Grocery746865645170
Medicine16195152918
Clothes and sports goods475835615972
Petrol/diesel4349151838
Other91719261930
Table 2(b) Total household shopping expenditure on most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland, Quarter 1 2018
% households1
 Household expenditure (€)
Less than 100100 - 299300 - 499500 - 9991000+
State22.538.622.614.12.2
Region
Border29.040.118.69.42.8
Midland24.930.57.527.59.6
West13.152.720.412.01.8
Dublin17.035.629.216.71.6
Mid-East29.543.618.78.10.0
Mid-West, South-East and South-West214.327.324.731.81.9
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children27.638.021.811.21.5
2 adults no dependent children24.536.320.315.73.2
3 or more adults no dependent children17.743.926.410.51.5
1 adult with dependent children26.544.215.513.70.0
2 adults with dependent children19.937.425.015.42.2
3 or more adults with dependent children17.341.523.715.71.8
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged23.137.619.916.43.0
Second quintile - disadvantaged20.045.217.516.01.3
Third quintile - average26.537.124.68.92.8
Fourth quintile - affluent21.037.723.015.82.6
Fifth quintile - very affluent22.236.227.712.71.2
Age of reference person
15-199.786.40.03.90.0
20-2924.544.716.613.40.8
30-4422.134.623.117.32.8
45-6420.239.724.413.62.1
65+27.135.223.112.32.2
1Households who took a shopping trip to Northern Ireland in the 12 months prior to interview.
2These regions have been grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
>>
Less than €100€100-€299€300-€499€500-€999€1000+
Border29.040.118.69.42.8
Midland24.930.57.527.59.6
West13.152.720.412.01.6
Dublin17.035.629.216.70.0
Mid-East29.543.618.78.10.0
Mid-West, South-East and South-West14.327.324.731.81.9
Table 2(c) Average household shopping expenditure on most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland, Quarter 1 2018
% households1
 Average household expenditure2 (€)Shopping categories
AlcoholCosmeticsFood and groceries3MedicineClothes, footwear and sports goodsPetrol/dieselOther
State275391289693630
Region
Border215231010485749
Midland363601410781371522
West289731793055545
Dublin2874113804121621
Mid-East22338565977620
Mid-West, South-East and South-West4412552311151452149
Household composition
1 adult no dependent children230311275786611
2 adults no dependent children259401098781416
3 or more adults no dependent children257401678493719
1 adult with dependent children25334121057661015
2 adults with dependent children2974310895106834
3 or more adults with dependent children3014017943116819
Deprivation quintile
First quintile - very disadvantaged2623213106687513
Second quintile - disadvantaged2603212100985416
Third quintile - average23736986873816
Fourth quintile - affluent3114314956111932
Fifth quintile - very affluent2595011602105725
Age of reference person
15-1919629544097515
20-29246382768592106
30-442914114877102931
45-642773810926103621
65+23139799665212
1Households who took a shopping trip to Northern Ireland in the 12 months prior to interview.
2Average household expenditure on most recent shopping trip to Northern Ireland.
3Includes tobacco.
4These regions have been grouped together because the sample size in each region was too small to produce individual estimates.
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
AlcoholCosmeticsGroceryMedicineClothes and sports goodsPetrol/dieselOther
Border231010485749
Midland601410781371522
West731793155545
Dublin4113804121621
Mid-East38565977620
Mid-West, South-East and South-West1552311151452149
Table 2(d) Total household expenditure on shopping in Northern Ireland (NI) in the 12 months prior to interview, Quarter 1 2018
Total expenditure (€'000s) on shopping in NI
All households who shopped in NIBorderMidlandWestDublinMid-EastMid-WestSouth-EastSouth-WestState
 
Shopping expenditure on shopping trips230,81311,7809,21062,67718,5152,7954,4702,916343,176
Other shopping expenditure55,7146,4967,59126,8345,6611,1035,7235,965115,087
 
Total shopping expenditure286,52718,27616,80189,51124,1763,89810,1938,881458,263
Note 1: Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.
Estimates are rounded to the nearest thousand so do not sum in all cases.

Background Notes

Purpose of Survey

The Cross-Border Shopping survey is a household survey on the spending of households on cross border shopping trips to Northern Ireland. A module on Cross-Border Shopping was previously carried out in 2009 and 2010, as a module of the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS).

Questionnaire Design

The survey instrument for the Cross-Border Shopping survey has changed since it was last carried out in Q2 2010, when it was carried out as a module of the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS). The Labour Force Survey (LFS) replaced the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS) at the beginning of Q3 2017. The introduction of the new LFS is part of a wider Household Survey Development (HSD) modernisation project. With this change, modules previously carried out as modules of the QNHS, are now carried out as part of the General Household Survey (GHS). The GHS is a national survey that place takes place three or four times each year. The survey usually has a core of common demographic questions that are always asked (e.g. age, sex, education, etc.). Each survey also has a specific theme: for example, in the second half of 2017, the survey measured participation rates of adults in further education; in the first quarter of 2018 the GHS covered the Cross-Border Shopping survey and the ICT Household survey.

Here below are the topics we have covered so far:

 Year    

 Quarter    

 Topic

 2017

 Quarter 3 and Quarter 4

 Adult Education Survey

 2018

 Quarter 1

 Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and Cross Border Shopping 

 

 Quarter 2 and Quarter 3

 Household Financial Consumption Survey (HFCS)

 2018

 Quarter 4

 Omnibus Survey

 2019

 Quarter 1

 European Health Interview Survey

You can find more information here: https://www.cso.ie/en/aboutus/takingpartinasurvey/surveysofhouseholdsindividuals/generalhouseholdsurvey/

Reference Period

The Cross-Border Shopping survey was carried out in the three months from January to March (Quarter 1) in 2018. The questionnaire asked questions about visits to Northern Ireland, and in particular, household spend on shopping trips to Northern Ireland.

Survey Coverage

The Cross-Border Shopping survey was collected directly from private households. Institutional households, (e.g. nursing homes, barracks, boarding schools, hotels etc.) are not covered by the survey. A household is defined as a single person or group of people who usually reside together in the same accommodation and who share the same catering arrangements. The household members are not necessarily related by blood or marriage.

A person is defined as a "Usual Resident" of a private household if he or she

  1. Lives regularly at the dwelling in question, and
  2. Shares the main living accommodation (i.e. kitchen, living room or bathroom) with the other members of the household.

Data Collection

The data was collected by a team of up to one hundred Field Interviewers and ten Field coordinators (each with a team of ten interviewers). Interviewers were provided with a map of each of their interview areas as well as a listing of the address of each of the selected households. These interviewers also working on CSO surveys such as the Survey on Income and Living Conditions and the Labour Force Survey. Interviewers received a manual with information such as detailed explanations about the questionnaire, definitions of the concepts involved and examples.

It was conducted using a team of face-to-face interviewers using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). This enabled the use of extensive checks in the BLAISE interviewing software to make sure correct and coherent data was collected.

One person from each household was selected. Information was collected directly from respondents - proxy responses from other members of the household were not accepted.

Sample Design

The sample for the General Household Survey (GHS) is stratified using administrative county and the Pobal HP (Haase and Pratschke) Deprivation Index (quintile). A two-stage sample design is used. In the first stage 1,300 blocks are selected using Probability Proportional to Size (PPS) sampling. In the second stage households are selected using Simple Random Sampling (SRS). This ensures each household in the sample frame has an equal probability of selection.

The total sample size for the Cross-Border Shopping survey in Quarter 1 2018 was 9,900 households. The number of valid responding households was 5,291.

The survey results were weighted to agree with population estimates broken down by age, sex and region and are also calibrated to nationality totals

Derivation of Results

To provide national population results, the survey results were weighted to represent the entire population of 16 to 74 year olds. The survey results were weighted to agree with population estimates broken down by age group, sex and region and were also calibrated to nationality totals.

Household weights were calculated for all households in the initial sample. The design weights are computed as the inverse of the selection probability of the unit. The purpose of design weights is to eliminate the bias induced by unequal selection probabilities.

These design weights were then adjusted for non-response. This eliminated the bias introduced by discrepancies caused by non-response, particularly critical when the non-responding households are different from the responding ones in respect to some survey variables as this may create substantial bias in the estimates. Design weights are adjusted for non-response by dividing the design weights of each responding unit in the final/achieved sample by the (weighted) response probability of the corresponding group or strata.

To obtain the final household weights for the results, after the previous steps were carried out, the distribution of households by deprivation, NUTS3 region, sex and age was calibrated to the population of households in Quarter 1 2018 (as derived from the LFS Survey). The CALMAR2-macro, developed by INSEE, was used for this purpose.

Note on Tables

The sum of row or column percentages in the tables in this report may not add to 100.0% due to rounding.

Percentage breakdowns exclude cases where the interviewee did not respond.

Disclosure Control


Estimates for number of persons where there are less than 30 persons in a cell are too small to be considered reliable. These estimates are presented with an asterisk (*) in the relevant tables.

Where there are 30-49 persons in a cell, estimates are considered to have a wider margin of error and should be treated with caution. These cells are presented with parentheses [ ].

In the case of rates, these limits apply to the denominator used in generating the rate. In the case of annual changes, both the current year and the preceding year are taken into account when deciding whether the estimate should be suppressed or flagged as having a wider margin of error.

Reliability of Estimates Presented

Data are subject to sampling and other survey errors, which are relatively greater in respect of smaller values.

Classifications Used

Region

The regional classifications in this release are based on the NUTS (Nomenclature of Territorial Units) classification used by Eurostat. Until Q4 2017, the NUTS3 regions corresponded to the eight Regional Authorities established under the Local Government Act, 1991 (Regional Authorities) (Establishment) Order, 1993, which came into operation on 1 January 1994 while the NUTS2 regions, which were proposed by Government and agreed by Eurostat in 1999, were groupings of those historic NUTS3 regions.

However, the NUTS3 boundaries were amended on 21st of November 2016 under Regulation (EC) No. 2066/2016 and have come into force from Q1 2018. The changes resulting from the amendment are that County Louth has moved from the Border to the Mid-East and what was formerly South Tipperary has moved from the South-East to the Mid-West, resulting in the new NUTS2 and NUTS3 regions. For the purposes of this release, the old NUTS3 regions were used. The composition of the regions used in this release is set out below.


The composition of the regions is set out below.

Border, Midland and Western NUTS2 Region Southern and Eastern NUTS2 Region
Border Cavan Dublin Dublin City
  Donegal   Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown
  Leitrim   Fingal
  Louth   South Dublin
  Monaghan    
  Sligo Mid-East Kildare
      Meath
Midland Laois   Wicklow
  Longford Mid-West Clare
  Offaly   Limerick City
  Westmeath   Limerick County
      North Tipperary
West Galway City    
  Galway County South-East Carlow
  Mayo   Kilkenny
  Roscommon   South Tipperary
      Waterford City<
      Waterford County
      Wexford
       
    South-West Cork City
      Cork County
      Kerry

Deprivation Index

The Pobal Haase-Pratschke Deprivation Index is used to create the underlying sample and is used to analyse the data. The Index uses Census data to measure levels of disadvantage or affluence in a geographical area. More detailed information on the index can be found here: https://www.pobal.ie/research-analysis/

The results are presented by quintiles, five equal-sized groups of households, with the first quintile representing the most disadvantaged areas and the fifth quintile representing the least deprived/most affluent areas.

The five quintiles are described below:

  • First Quintile - Very disadvantaged
  • Second Quintile - Disadvantaged
  • Third Quintile - Average
  • Fourth Quintile - Affluent
  • Fifth Quintile - Very affluent (least deprived)


Household Composition

For the purposes of deriving household composition, a child was defined as any member of the household aged 17 or under.  Households were analysed as a whole, regardless of the number of family units within the household.  The categories of household composition are:

  • 1 adult aged 18+ with no dependent children
  • 2 adults aged 18+ with no dependent children
  • 3 adults aged 18+ with no dependent children
  • 1 adult aged 18+ with dependent children aged <18
  • 2 adults aged 18+ with dependent children aged <18
  • 3 adults aged 18+ with dependent children aged <18

 
QNHS Social Modules


While the main purpose of the QNHS was the production of quarterly labour force estimates, there is also a provision for the collection of data on social topics through the inclusion of special survey modules. The selection of the major national modules undertaken to date has been largely based on the results of a canvass of users (over 100 organisations) that was conducted by the CSO in 1996, 2002, 2006, 2008 and most recently 2011. The results of the canvass are presented to the National Statistics Board and they are asked to indicate their priorities for the years ahead.

The schedule for social modules in any given year is based on the following structure:

Quarter 1   Accidents and Illness module and  Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) Survey
Quarter 2   EU module (always covered under EU legislation)
Quarter 3   National module
Quarter 4   National module

Some of the social modules published to date in the QNHS are outlined below:

Q2 Households and Family Units 2017
Q2 2016 Households and Family Units
Q2 2016 QNHS Union Membership
Irish Health Survey 2015
Q4 2015 Pensions
Q3 2015 Crime and Victimisation
Q2 2015 Households and Family Units
Q3 2014 Equality Module
Q2 2014 Environment Module
Q3 2013 Volunteering and Wellbeing
Q2 2013 Sport and Physical Exercise
Q3 2012 Effect on Households of the Economic Downturn
Q2 2012 Retirement Planning
Q2 2012 Parental Involvement in Children’s Education
Q2 2012 Union Membership
Q1 2012 Unemployment Thematic Report
Q2 2011 Response of Households to the Economic Downturn - Pilot Module
Q2 2011 Voter Participation
Q4 2010 Equality
Q3 2010 Health Status and Health Service Utilisation
Q2 2010 Cross Border Shopping
Q2 2010 Educational Attainment
Q1 2010 Crime and Victimisation
Q4 2009 Pension Provision
Q3 2009 Carers
Q2 2009 Union Membership
Q2 2009 Cross Border Shopping
Q3 2008 Lifelong Learning
Q4 2007 Childcare
Q3 2007 Health Status and Health Service Utilisation
Q3 2006 Sport and Physical Exercise

More historical social modules published are available at:

http://www.cso.ie/en/qnhs/releasesandpublications/qnhs-specialmodules/qnhs-specialmodulesarchive/.

Acknowledgement

The Central Statistics Office wishes to thank the participating households for their co-operation in agreeing to take part in the Q1 2018 Cross-Border Shopping survey and for facilitating the collection of the relevant data.

upArrowHide Background Notes

Scan the QR code below to view this release online or go to
http://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/er/cbs/crossbordershopping-households2018/