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Public Safety

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An increase in the percentage of people reporting they have been a victim of violent and non-violent crime has a negative influence on well-being.

Year
20035
20065
20104
20155

Performance of indicator:

Self-reported victimisation of crime, which includes crimes such as violent and non-violent theft, physical assault and fraud, has remained relatively constant over time. The rate was 5% in 2003 and 2006, falling to 4% in 2010, and increasing to 5% in 2015. It is a measure of victimisation among the population aged 18 years and older.

Justification of indicator:

Self-reported victimisation rates provide details on whether an individual was a victim of a crime, regardless of whether the crime was reported to the authorities or not. Increases in the level of self-victimisation have a negative impact on well-being, as it identifies an increase in the level of certain crimes. Being a victim of a crime is obviously detrimental to well-being.

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An increase in the percentage of people worrying about becoming a victim of crime has a negative influence on well-being.

Year
200339
200634
201027
201530

Performance of indicator:

There has been a fall in the percentage worried about becoming a victim of both personal and theft/damage from 39% in 2003 to 30% in 2015. However, there has been an increase in this rate since 2010, when it was 27%.

Justification of indicator:

An increase in the rate of people who are worried about becoming a victim of crime themselves, as separate from the actual level of crime, can lead to heightened stress levels. It is a subjective measure which can affect the emotional and psychological aspects of well-being. It may put strains on social cohesion, reducing levels of trust among members or society even if such fears are unsubstantiated.

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An increase in the percentage of those that think crime is a serious or very serious problem in Ireland has a negative influence on well-being.

Year
199838.3
200346.5
200645.9
201049

Performance of indicator:

The percentage of persons aged 18 or over that think that crime is a very serious problem has increased from 38% in 1998 to 49% in 2010.

Justification:

The perception of the seriousness of crime in a country, as separate from crime on an individual level, can lead to increased anxiety, stress, and fear in the broader population. This may affect the psychological wellbeing of individuals in a different way to actually suffering as a victim of crime.

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An increase in the number of injuries and fatalities from road traffic accidents has a negative influence on well-being.

Year
20108482
20117421
20128105
20137069
20148272

Performance of indicator:

The number of casualties from road traffic accidents in 2014 was 8,272 with 8,079 injuries and 193 fatalities. This was an increase on 2013, when the corresponding figures were 7,069 accidents, 6,880 injuries and 188 fatalities.

Justification of indicator:

Being injured in a road traffic accident can have a severe impact on well-being. Outside of the direct physical health consequences, there can be a psychological impact associated with injury. There can also be wider economic consequences, both direct and indirect. Road traffic accidents also account for a high number of deaths amongst the younger population, being the fourth highest cause of death among young people in Ireland.[1] An increase in the number of casualties is bad for well-being, not only for the individuals and families concerned but also for society.

[1] http://www.rsa.ie/Documents/Fatal%20Collision%20Stats/Road_Collision_Factbooks_and_Tables/Road%20Collision%20Facts%202014%20-%20Tables.pdf

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