Back to Top

Central Statistics Office

Search currently unavailable

 Skip navigation

Education

Print
Open in Excel:

An increase in the percentage of those aged 25-64 with third level education has a positive influence on well-being

Year
201439
201541
201641

Performance of indicator:

The percentage of those aged 25 to 64 with third level education has increased from 39% in 2014 to 41% in 2015. It has remained at 41% for 2016.

Justification of indicator:

Educational attainment is a major contributor to individual well-being. Higher levels of educational attainment can have a positive impact on material living conditions as it is associated with both lower levels of unemployment and higher income. There is also research pointing to the correlation between higher levels of education and better health.[1]

[1] http://www.nber.org/papers/w0022.pdf

Print
Open in Excel:

A decrease in the percentage of persons aged 25-64 that have at most lower secondary has a positive influence on well-being.

Year
201421
201520
201619

Performance of indicator:

The percentage of the population aged 25 to 64 with at most lower secondary education as their highest level of educational attainment has decreased from 21% in 2014 to 19% in 2016.[2]

Justification of indicator:

The rate of individuals that leave school early can be seen as a proxy for how an educational system is performing. It is also important as individuals with lower levels of education are more susceptible to being unemployed, and of having lower levels of health – both of which contribute to personal well-being. Target 4.1 identified in the OECD document ‘Education at a Glance 2017” also states that it should be ensured that all girls and boys complete free, equitable, and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and effective learning outcomes.[3]

[2] At most lower secondary education indicates that the respondent’s highest level of education is junior certificate or lower.

Print
Open in Excel:

An increase in the percentage of persons who have basic or above basic digital skills has a positive influence on well-being.

 

Year
201544
201644

Performance of indicator:

The percentage of the Irish population aged 16 to 74 years old that have basic or above basic overall digital skills has remained constant in the years 2015 and 2016 at 44%.[4][5]

Justification of indicator:

In a rapidly changing labour market, cross-cutting skills such as the ability to use computers, IT tools and the internet are becoming more and more important. Such transversal skills can help to improve the employment capacity of an individual, and can also improve their levels of social inclusion. It is assumed that individuals having performed certain activities have the corresponding skills; therefore the indicator can be considered a proxy of the digital competency and skill of an individual. The indicator is based on the Information, Communication and Technology Survey of usage in households and by individuals

[4] http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/cache/metadata/en/tepsr_sp410_esmsip.htm

[5] The basic or above basic overall digital skills represent the two highest levels of the overall digital skills indicator, which is a composite indicator based on selected activities performed by individuals aged 16-74 on the internet in the four specific areas (information, communication, problem solving, content creation).

Print
Open in Excel:

An increase in the mean mathematical score in PISA has a positive influence on well-being.

Year
2006501
2009487
2012501
2015504

Performance of indicator:

In 2006, the mean score in mathematics in PISA was 501. This fell to 487 in 2009, and returned to 501 in 2012. It has increased in 2015 to 504.[6] The scale developed by the OECD ranges from 0 – 1,000.

Justification of indicator:

The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests the skills and knowledge of 15 year olds across the OECD. Different skills are assessed, including; reading, mathematics and science, financial literacy, and problem solving. Mathematics has been selected as the indicator, as proficiency in mathematics can help prepare students for many different roles in the workplace, including analytics, engineering, and information technology.

[6] The scale developed by the OECD ranges from 0 to 1,000. The average OECD scores for 2009, 2012, and 2015 were 496, 494, and 490 respectively.

Go to next chapter: Housing and Natural Environment